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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
as far as that road that is concerned whether it is the road map to elections as the ambassador was speaking to or a road map for the negotiations between the various disaffected elements in the north of bahrain to renounce violence and engage in an negotiations process. obviously if we get to a point of elections being held and being able to resume assistance with the forces, that will be an important step forward for the united states to be able to directly help the malian forces in addition to other contributing countries. european union, france, others have already begun to really engage with the malian forces, so it isn't as if there is an abstinence of support for them in the intervening period. >> what lessons have we learned, if i might, ms. dory and mr. gast, i think the mission just celebrated the 50th anniversary. we were actively engaged in the training a good thing as a part of the very probably democracy support and in trying to create and sustain a cultural democracy what lessons are there that we might learn going forward about political failures and more on dome
on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that spread to egypt and the egyptian revolution was concern to the united states. egypt has long held incredible importance to u.s. policy in the middle east. the u.s. reaction to that revolution was unclear. there were some that said this was a good thing that this would only lead to democracy. there were others who in
sharif come in, there's a reinvolving door act, and he returns to power in 1993. wins the election. my father returns to pakistan. >> is he welcomed by your aunt? >> arrested at the airport,s plane -- >> welcomedded in a manner of speaking. >> welcomed as -- as they react to each other, but, anyway, he is arrested at the airport on all the scharnlgs held over from the last period and taken to jail, again, all charges that carry the death penalty, charges of treason. one by one, the cases against him are acquitted in them. , and he comes out of jail, and he starts to travel around the country. he founds a reformed movement, an elected member of the prudential assembly. in quite early on in the regime, she empowers the security forces in the city, and under operation clean up to, quote, clean up the city, and what that means, really is it means whatever the security forces would like it to mean. in the two-year period it's in effect, some 3,000 men are murdered, and in what we call police encounters, which is, you know, a flagrant abuse of language because encounter is what happens when
duly elected leadership are built on more stable foundation this can be substantial but brutal ties the u.s. maintains with the hosni mubarak regime in egypt or yemen. nowhere in the region is the struggle against dictatorship more vital than in syria. over the past 20 months it has become abundantly clear that with assad in power there is no possibility, none whatever, for democratic process in syria. for years syria has been one of the most repressive countries in the world according to the state department rights reports, analytical studies by freedom house. political dissidents were routinely in prisons or disappeared and journalists were silenced. human-rights activists operated underground living in constant fear of the dreaded -- mr reuel marc gerecht 23 -- assad was cast by many as a, quote, reformer but his terrible treatment of his own people should have been a strong indication of what he was really all about. callie government treats its people the true testament to its character. callie government treats its own people in vindication of how it will act on the world stag
that president was in cambodia right after the election. he was in burma. secretary clinton moved widely throughout the region as does secretary panetta. and the amount of activities that i do and my forces do have been a prompt jump in what we've done in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we're doing more of those things already. i think it's visible to our allies. i think it's visible to our partners. not to be invisible to the region. we also want to jump, where's the next summary our aircraft carrier, that's always the sake of. and we will, over time as you heard secretary panetta said, we will rebalance our navy towards the pacific, and i party mentioned in my opening remarks, we are rapidly moving our most capable assets in the region because of some of the ballistic missile defense will be facing of those types of things. so i think it's not about one thing. it's about a holistic approach, and what if you on the military side is only one aspect of a. it's got to be tied to what's happening in the economic side in what's happening in the diplomatic s
served across eight presidential administrations and formed the coalition to stress the need for elected officials to act. not only has the passage of time exacerbated some of the economic problems, it is revealed perhaps equally political. our inability to grapple with the pressing fiscal to the just represents nothing less than dhaka crisis in our space order. compounding the instability and unpredictability in a volatile world. ever proposition is simple. the national security in the united states depends on its economic health. that must be ensured by averting the immediate crisis, and by laying the ground short for the rigorous long-term program of the debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth, and lower income inequality. in the national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently than response to threats that are evolving before our eyes. and resources need to be shifted towards them on military elements of the national security posture. in the immediate term, and by that i mean over the next four weeks, we must avoid driving the country over the fis
that while the elections may be exciting, the future of egypt is enshrine in this constitution that they are haggling over right now. >> and obviously, the constitution, you could argue whether egypt is better with or without one. probably better with one. although, there are great problems with freedom of religion, freedom of association, freedom of the press, freedom of rights for women. it will have to be improved upon. >> this is where political will and puritanism will be enshrined. >> will these various players compete to monopolize? that has been their experience and tradition going back tomorrow. or will this competition and tension actually produce respect for the roles of these institutions and compromise? something that they are clearly going to have to try to figure out. >> and you can see it even with americans in capitol hill. what are your thoughts about how this will work out? >> if you are a glass is half full, the institutional society right now is the muslim brotherhood, but you have an opposition that has been reenergize. the key is, can they become organize
was interested to see what you were writing about on the bbc website. you point out that while the elections may be exciting, the future of egypt is enshrine in this constitution that they are haggling over right now. >> and obviously, the constitution, you could argue whether egypt is better with or without one. probably better with one. although, there are great problems with freedom of religion, freedom of association, freedom of the press, freedom of rights for women. it will have to be improved upon. >> this is where political will and puritanism will be enshrined. >> will these various players compete to monopolize? that has been their experience and tradition going back tomorrow. or will this competition and tension actually produce respect for the roles of these institutions and compromise? something that they are clearly going to have to try to figure out. >> and you can see it even with americans in capitol hill. what are your thoughts about how this will work out? >> if you are a glass is half full, the institutional society right now is the muslim brotherhood, but you have an opposit
would note that the president was in cam cambodia after the election, and then he was in burma, and secretary clinton moves throughout the region as well as secretary panetta, and the amount of activities i do and my forces do is a prompt jump than what we did in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we are doing more of those things already, and that's viz l to the allies. i think it's visible to the partners, and i feel it visible to the region. we oftenment to jump to, well, where's the next aircraft carry your or the submarine. that's the signal. we will, over time, as you've heard secretary panetta say, rebalance towards the pacific, and i mentioned opening remarks. we're rapidly moving the most capable assets into the region because of the ballistic missile defense threats we face and those things, so it's about a holistic approach, and what i do on the military side is just one aspect of it. it's got to be tie into the economic side, what's happening in the diplomatic side, and so we're working hard that accomplishes this strategy. >> a quick
. they just haven't elected to before. that's not the case. it's very clear in senate rules if you challenge a ruling constitutional, that challenge is debatable and the debate itself can be filibustered. but what they're going to have to get in this case, senator calls for a point of order suggesting the filibusters unconstitutional. is ignore the parliamentarian who will say can be debated and steamrolled over the parliamentarian and basically break their own rules by not allowing debate. ornstein also argued quote basically the essential character of the senate in the system, the republican form of democracy trying to avoid the emotions of the majority is to provide some outlet for minorities. change than come you can really do, i'm sorry. change that and you would be moved to the potential of tyranny to the majority. there'll always be a president of the lies the congressional leader. that temptation to overrule will always be there. it is there today. what harry reid is trying to do is wrong. if the only way for conservatism is to fight back is engage in a fight. if he is going to push
relationship, i don't think that that kind of thing -- >> what matters is japan does have election on the summer 16th. are they worried about china trying to put together a leader democracy in the region including india because that was his strategy that if you put together things, much more like your when you think, i know you can't in your position talk one way or another about prime minister but this notion about a strategic -- is japan really need to invest in structures that balance -- are you worried that given your experience you have to balance china much more vigorously than you did in the past? >> yes. most frequently you ask question for japanese people is whether we regard china as a threat or a chance for an hour and should is would like to see china development as a chance rather than threat. >> what you think will really happen? >> there is a assumption that china continues to be kind of international stakeholder, stakeholder, international community. international order and they respect the communication with the other countries. on the assumption i think we can wel
of leverage comes in to play. he came out of the election, he says that he ran on this issue of raising tax rates on wealthy. he believes he is very much the leverage in this negotiation and so you don't see him budging. republicans see the little levers that they have in the debt ceiling fight. these are two separate issues but they're all coming together at the same time. welcome to washington. everything kind of comes together all at the same time unfortunately. the debt ceiling if it is not part of any agreement, regarding the fiscal cliff to avert the fiscal cliff they will need to take up this question of raising the debt ceiling come likely early next year. republicans see that the question of raising the debt creeling is where they have leverage in this negotiation. the president and democrats do not want the debt ceiling to be kind of -- raising the debt ceiling to be part of this negotiation. they do not want this on their plate come early next year. it all comes down to leverage. democrats see that they have the leverage here because look at most recent polls today. if you look a
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)